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Tyler Posey puckering up, Jordy’s ‘absolute’ jam & more: Your weekly bop roundup

Jordy, Tyler Posey, and Wrabel.

Cheers to the freakin’ weekend, readers.

As the days start to get longer again, the cold is slowly but surely melting off. It’s been a hot week, honestly: Adam DiMarco’s “demon twink” moment had folks feeling ecstatic, that Bad Bunny/Gael García Bernal kiss was movie magic, and Tom Daley showed out with a “behind” the scenes look at his workouts.

Naturally, this week’s tunes have to be hot, too! We’ve got a were-hunk, a couple saucy sadboys, a funky nonbinary flex, and more.

From Kesha’s bestie to a single that’s zesty, welcome to your weekly bop roundup!

“Lemon” by Tyler Posey

 

Our resident sexually fluid Teen Wolf lead has had a little bit of a “the show must go all over the place” musical journey, but his fans (the real ones who weren’t just sticking around in the hopes of an OnlyFans resurgence) are along for the ride. His new video shows off his flair for riding the line between serious and silly — or rather, plays with both side-by-side. Dropping a new song the same night as the new Teen Wolf movie might get this overshadowed a bit, but his ride-or-dies are bopping along.

“Story of a Boy” by Jordy

Did not except a resurgence of the ’00s band Nine Days in the 2020s, but that’s the cyclical nature of art! Last year, their hit “Absolutely (Story of a Girl)” was woven throughout the smash hit film Everything, Everywhere, All At Once. Now, Queerty Music Video nominee Jordy has given the track another boost by reimagining it from a gay point of view — hence, “Story of a Boy.” The sound has been updated from the original garage band of it all, but the essence is still evident.

“happier” by Wrabel

Wrabel, the queer songwriting heavyweight behind songs from folks like Kesha, Tori Kelly, and Years and Years (as well as his own LGBTQ+ anthem “The Village”) is gearing up for his next solo project, and the pen is already hitting. “happier” is our first taste of the upcoming “chapter of me” EP due out April 24 via Big Gay Records, and it’s sure to give you what would’ve once been referred to as “all of the feels”. Him being adorable throughout the video is just a bonus!

“Matcha Tea (Remix) by Cassidy King ft. WRENN

Remember when Troye remixed his divorce album lead “Easy” with Kacey Musgraves providing an opposite view of a breakup? Here, rising singer Cassidy King enlists tech pop star WRENN to do the same — this time, as opposite views of the same break. It’s smooth, it’s sentimental, it’s sapphic; what more can you want?

“I’m Not Here To Make Friends” by Sam Smith

We referred Calvin Harris’ Funk Wav content just last week, and lo and behold, who should turn up but Calvin Harris with a Funk Wav beat! This time, it’s underscoring one of the more purely pop tracks we’ve ever gotten from Sam Smith once again joined by Jessie Reyez. With Reyez on their new album Gloria three different times, Smith has to officially identify as a stan of hers. It’s certainly not uncalled for! P.S. the RuPaul intro has to have clinched them a guest judge spot on whatever Rupaul’s Drag Race season films next.

Join us next week for another Bop After Bop!

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Learning From COVID: Early Detection, Isolation, and Elimination Beats More Defensive Responses As Global Strategy for Future Pandemics

The Conversation

file 20230117 25 pmbqda.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Getty images

Imagine it is 2030. Doctors in a regional hospital in country X note an expanding cluster of individuals with severe respiratory disease. Rapid whole-genome sequencing identifies the disease-causing agent as a novel coronavirus.

Epidemiological investigations suggest the virus is highly infectious, with most initial cases requiring hospitalisation. The episode bears a striking resemblance to the COVID outbreak first detected in December 2019.

Regional and national health authorities are notified quickly. The national contact point for the International Health Regulations 2024 (a major revision to the current IHR 2005) sends a description to the World Health Organization (WHO). After an intense exchange of information and risk assessment, it declares a public health emergency of international concern.

The outbreak is assigned a response strategy of “elimination”. This designation initiates a well-rehearsed procedure, including mobilising expertise and resource stockpiles.

The elimination response results in localised quarantine measures at the epicentre and its surrounds and a travel freeze across a wide radius within country X and at its borders. It also prompts intensified local and international surveillance. Case numbers rise rapidly but plateau after three weeks, and then fall until no new cases are detected in the community.

After eight weeks of intensive efforts the outbreak is over – similar to the experience of New Zealand, which terminated its initial COVID outbreak in eight weeks using an elimination strategy. The outbreak had spread regionally within country X, but not internationally.

This is how we propose, in The Lancet, the world should respond to future pandemic threats.

An upgraded pandemic response to eliminate at source

The process by which the WHO currently decides whether to declare a public health emergency of international concern (under the International Health Regulations 2005) has drawn criticism for being too slow.

The upgraded response framework we propose would enhance the existing risk assessment by routinely requiring WHO to assign a high-level response strategy for managing this risk. For potential pandemics, we consider this strategy should be elimination rather than suppression or mitigation, which have been the usual default options in the past. In simple terms, “if in doubt, stamp it out”.

The idea of eliminating novel emerging infectious diseases at the earliest possible stage is intuitively appealing and not new. It has been proposed for eliminating novel pandemic influenza outbreaks.

This approach successfully eliminated and then eradicated the SARS pandemic in 2003 (caused by SARS-CoV). It also proved successful in China during early containment of COVID in Wuhan.

We have described this concept previously. Whether this approach could have eliminated and ultimately eradicated COVID, if pursued early and in a co-ordinated way globally, remains a topic of speculation.

An elimination strategy also slows the spread of infection

There is a second broad reason for the WHO assigning an explicit strategic goal of elimination to pandemic diseases with sufficient severity. It can also slow or interrupt the global spread of a new infectious disease. This action buys time for interventions to be developed, building on rapidly accumulating scientific knowledge.

Some countries in the Asia-Pacific region adopted elimination and strong suppression strategies. This approach largely prevented widespread COVID circulation for the first one to two years of the pandemic, keeping mortality rates low.

It allowed time for vaccine development and roll-out and for jurisdictions to prepare their health systems for managing large numbers of infected people. Notable examples are New Zealand, Australia and Singapore. They have been able to keep their cumulative mortality low by international standards.

This world map shows that cumulative numbers of deaths in countries.
New Zealand, Australia and Singapore have lower cumulative numbers of deaths than other countries. Our World in Data, CC BY-ND

If elimination is ultimately not successful or justifiable, an organised transition to another strategy (suppression or mitigation) should be considered. Processes for managing these transitions can draw on experience from the current pandemic.

Elimination makes sense for other potential pandemics

The most recently declared public health emergency of international concern is mpox (formerly known as monkeypox). Under our proposed change to the International Health Regulations, the WHO would have been required to assign a response strategy to this disease.

Elimination again makes sense as a default approach. That is what countries around the world have effectively been doing. And this approach appears to be working.

The other current public health emergency of international concern is poliomyelitis. Unlike COVID and mpox, this disease is already subject to a global eradication goal.

A further benefit of the elimination strategy is that it supports strengthening of health system infrastructure in low and middle-income countries. This capacity building has contributed to the elimination of periodic Ebola outbreaks in Africa, which have been designated as public health emergencies of international concern in 2014-16 and 2019-20. It could also support elimination of mpox, an increasing threat in Africa.

Upgraded International Health Regulations could stimulate a huge global investment in infrastructure to stop epidemics at source and improve surveillance capacity. These capacities are critical given the range of future pandemic scenarios, including the threat from bioweapons with advances in synthetic biology.

Let us hope that when the world is next confronted by the spark of a new emerging infectious disease with pandemic potential, the WHO rapidly declares a public health emergency of international concern and assigns an elimination strategy. And the international community reacts vigorously to extinguish the spark before it becomes an inferno.

Michael Baker, Professor of Public Health, University of Otago; David Durrheim, Professor of Public Health Medicine, University of Newcastle; Li Yang HSU, Vice Dean of Global Health, National University of Singapore, and Nick Wilson, Professor of Public Health, University of Otago

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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The Way We Were's Secret Gay Backstory

The Way We WereAs the first few haunting notes of the title song sound and the unmistakable voice of Barbra Streisand intones “mem’ries,” most of us can’t help but settle in for yet another viewing of The Way We Were, even though we know how the turbulent romance of Katie Morosky and Hubbell Gardiner turns out.

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Tyler Posey puckering up, Jordy’s ‘absolute’ jam & more: Your weekly bop roundup

Jordy, Tyler Posey, and Wrabel.

Cheers to the freakin’ weekend, readers.

As the days start to get longer again, the cold is slowly but surely melting off. It’s been a hot week, honestly: Adam DiMarco’s “demon twink” moment had folks feeling ecstatic, that Bad Bunny/Gael García Bernal kiss was movie magic, and Tom Daley showed out with a “behind” the scenes look at his workouts.

Naturally, this week’s tunes have to be hot, too! We’ve got a were-hunk, a couple saucy sadboys, a funky nonbinary flex, and more.

From Kesha’s bestie to a single that’s zesty, welcome to your weekly bop roundup!

“Lemon” by Tyler Posey

 

Our resident sexually fluid Teen Wolf lead has had a little bit of a “the show must go all over the place” musical journey, but his fans (the real ones who weren’t just sticking around in the hopes of an OnlyFans resurgence) are along for the ride. His new video shows off his flair for riding the line between serious and silly — or rather, plays with both side-by-side. Dropping a new song the same night as the new Teen Wolf movie might get this overshadowed a bit, but his ride-or-dies are bopping along.

“Story of a Boy” by Jordy

Did not except a resurgence of the ’00s band Nine Days in the 2020s, but that’s the cyclical nature of art! Last year, their hit “Absolutely (Story of a Girl)” was woven throughout the smash hit film Everything, Everywhere, All At Once. Now, Queerty Music Video nominee Jordy has given the track another boost by reimagining it from a gay point of view — hence, “Story of a Boy.” The sound has been updated from the original garage band of it all, but the essence is still evident.

“happier” by Wrabel

Wrabel, the queer songwriting heavyweight behind songs from folks like Kesha, Tori Kelly, and Years and Years (as well as his own LGBTQ+ anthem “The Village”) is gearing up for his next solo project, and the pen is already hitting. “happier” is our first taste of the upcoming “chapter of me” EP due out April 24 via Big Gay Records, and it’s sure to give you what would’ve once been referred to as “all of the feels”. Him being adorable throughout the video is just a bonus!

“Matcha Tea (Remix) by Cassidy King ft. WRENN

Remember when Troye remixed his divorce album lead “Easy” with Kacey Musgraves providing an opposite view of a breakup? Here, rising singer Cassidy King enlists tech pop star WRENN to do the same — this time, as opposite views of the same break. It’s smooth, it’s sentimental, it’s sapphic; what more can you want?

“I’m Not Here To Make Friends” by Sam Smith

We referred Calvin Harris’ Funk Wav content just last week, and lo and behold, who should turn up but Calvin Harris with a Funk Wav beat! This time, it’s underscoring one of the more purely pop tracks we’ve ever gotten from Sam Smith once again joined by Jessie Reyez. With Reyez on their new album Gloria three different times, Smith has to officially identify as a stan of hers. It’s certainly not uncalled for! P.S. the RuPaul intro has to have clinched them a guest judge spot on whatever Rupaul’s Drag Race season films next.

Join us next week for another Bop After Bop!

Read More

Shocking Paul Pelosi Attack Video, 911 Call Released

Alleged attacker David DePape inside the home of Paul Pelosi who appears to be struggling with the intruder over a hammer.Friday afternoon, authorities in California released several pieces of evidence surrounding the attack on then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s husband, Paul, last October.

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Queer Fans Coming Out at Harry Styles Shows Makes for a Special Space

I have attended my fair share of Harry Styles concerts (12 and counting!) and of the last eight, I think I’ve witnessed at least three people come out.

The post Queer Fans Coming Out at Harry Styles Shows Makes for a Special Space appeared first on Autostraddle.

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TikTok priest says he ‘went to hell’ and saw men on all fours listening to Rihanna songs

Rihanna performing in a leopard top
credit: Shutterstock

Rihanna is not only performing at the Super Bowl, but, according to one priest, she also has a residency in hell.

Gerald Johnson, the religious leader of the Gerald A. Johnson Ministries in Texas, has gone viral after recently detailing how he went to satan’s playground and saw men on all fours being tortured to the sounds of Rihanna’s biggest hits. Put us on the list plus one!

Related: Rihanna unveils men’s harness as part of new Fenty lingerie collection

In a TikTok video, Johnson claims this demonic escapade occurred back in 2016 after he suffered a heart attack and “died.” He said his spirit left his body and traveled to the center of the earth where apparently the devil maintains prime real estate.

Johnson said he was immediately blown away with the fiery scene, which according to his description also appeared to border on some intense pup play.

“There was a man on all fours, like a dog…he was burned from the crown of his head to the sole’s of his feet and his eyes were bulging out,” Johnson recounted. “He had a chain around his neck. He was like a dog in hell. What was worse was who was holding the chain. It was a demon who was holding the chain.”

@geraldajohnson1 My experience when I saw hell in February 2016. I’ll never be the same after that. #hell #jesus #unforgiveness #forgive #godsaid #encouragement #geraldajohnson #jesuslovesyou #moveforward ♬ original sound – Gerald Johnson

But that was just the opening act. As he made his way deeper into Lucifer’s VIP room, the main stage began to look more like your worst karaoke nightmare come to life.

“There’s a section in hell where music was playing. It was the same music that we hear on the Earth, but as opposed to entertainers singing it, the music, demons were singing it. It was some of the same lyrics we hear here.”

According to Johnson, these demons use popular music to control humans while on Earth. And one of the biggest torture devices these evil goblins use is Rihanna’s 2007 monster earworm “Umbrella.” 

 “Here, music is to get over a breakup. ‘Don’t worry, be happy,’ ‘I bust the windows out your car,’ or, ‘under my umbrella,’ whatever,” Johnson said in reference to hit bops by Bobby McFerrin, Jazmine Sullivan, and RiRi. “There, every lyric to every song is to torment you as to the fact that you didn’t worship God through music when you were on the Earth.”

To no surprise, Rihanna is too booked and busy to have commented on Johnson’s hellfire tale.

For those not planning a tour of eternal damnation just yet, you can keep your fingers crossed that RiRi tortures us all with a lit version of “Umbrella” at the Super Bowl on Sunday, February 12th. Hella, hella, eh, eh, eh!

Related: Olly Alexander is slipping out of Rihanna’s Savage X Fenty underwear

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Dylan Mulvaney unveils her post-surgery visage in stunning “face reveal” video

Trans activist and 2023 Queerties Groundbreaker Dylan Mulvaney has been publicly documenting her transition journey for the world to share in since day one — literally. Since uploading her “Day 1 of being a girl” video back in March of 2022, she’s kept us updated on the successes and hardships of the actualization of her true self.

It’s only fitting that a trans healthcare milestone like her first facial feminization surgery would be equally accessible. After seeing her awaiting her procedure and recovering from it in a full bandage wrap, we’re finally getting a look at her new look.

In an appropriately theatrical video complete with wardrobe changes and an Audrey Hepburn nod, the influencer has officially introduced her audience to the new era of Dylan.

Feast your eyes on the eyes:

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dylan Mulvaney (@dylanmulvaney)

Her grand reveal begins with curtains parting on a Swan Lake-style scene with her decked out in Cameron Hughes’ long-awaited kinetic petal dress (you may remember Hughes’ work from Bosco’s Rupaul’s Drag Race season 14 finale headpiece or Doja Cat’s spinning flower bra).

Dylan gives her best ballet, all while serving face as the light blinks in and out before finally intensifying into a close-up.

The light then flashes to reveal her Hepburn moment that serves both as a Breakfast at Tiffany’s little black dress and a jazzy Funny Face nod, perfect for a face reveal. The homage was teased in her recent vision board video (with her face conveniently filtered, so as not to spoil the reveal). Among Barbie, Burberry, and Marilyn Monroe were Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Hepburn’s clean, classic eyeliner look.

She finishes the video with a stripped down, personal message to her supporters asserting the life-changing power of trans resources and assuring them that they have much to catch up on.

Support is already pouring in from all over. Jonathan Van Ness writes, “Stunning honeyyyy & this video is soo beautifullll” while Brooke Lynn Hytes comments, “I’m so happy for you, you look just beautiful” and a heart emoji. Milk Makeup, MAC Cosmetics, The Old Gays and more are chiming in to voice their love for the trailblazing talent.

We’ll have to wait a while more for her Groundbreaker Award acceptance speech, but ’til then you can vote for the rest of your LGBTQ+ faves in the 2023 Queerties! Vote once per day per device in each category, and don’t forget to use hashtag #Queerties to share your votes and help promote your favorites!

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